Publications

Recent Publications

Marine Aquaculture in Maine - 2018 Version

Submitted by Webmaster on Fri, 10/26/2018 - 10:28

Marine Aquaculture in Maine brochure coverMaine’s aquaculture industry raises finfish, shellfish, and seaweed in farms along the coast. The most significant commercial species are Atlantic salmon, blue mussels, oysters, and seaweed. Aquaculture farms must obtain a lease from the state because they operate in public waters. In this updated version of our publication Marine Aquaculture in Maine, learn how leases are granted, where farms are sited, what to look for in a responsible aquaculture operation, and more.

Marine Research in Focus: Counteracting the Myth of Dry Feet in Dutch Planning for Flood Defense

Submitted by Catherine Schmitt on Wed, 08/01/2018 - 14:26

Research in Focus fact sheet cover image click for PDFCoastal residents and towns need strategies to address climate change and its effects on sea-level rise, shoreline erosion, and coastal flooding. Extreme weather events can cause millions of dollars in damage and threaten coastal ecosystems and local economies. The Building a Resilient Coast project seeks to provide stakeholders with easy access to information to facilitate planning for climate and hazards impacts.

Bagaduce Fishway Panels

Submitted by Webmaster on Wed, 06/13/2018 - 14:43

In June 2018, the Town of Penobscot installed five new interpretive panels at Pierce's Pond. A new nature-like fishway provides passage for alewives and other sea-run fish, along with viewing platforms and a picnic area at the public boat launch. The Town and alewife steward Bailey Bowden, along with local partners at Maine Coast Heritage Trust, Blue Hill Heritage Trust, and Maine Center for Coastal Fisheries, are leading the effort to restore migratory fish to the entire Bagaduce watershed.

Coastal Storms: Research & Impact Monitoring at the University of Maine

Submitted by Catherine Schmitt on Tue, 05/29/2018 - 13:39

The Spring issue of UMaine Today magazine features an article about coastal storms-related research by Sea Grant and other UMaine programs and departments, including the Southern Maine Volunteer Beach Profiling Monitoring Program (with the Wells Reserve and Maine Geological Survey) and Ph.D.

Alewives in Maine Lakes

Submitted by Catherine Schmitt on Wed, 05/09/2018 - 13:23

1322_001.jpgThe Heart of the Sea: Alewives Bring Ocean Nutrients to Inland Lakes, an article in the May-June 2018 issue of Maine Boats, Homes & Harbors Magazine. The article provides an overview of sea-run alewives and their role in lake ecosystems, and interviews with researchers studying the impact of alewife restoration on Maine lakes. The article is part of our work on the Penobscot River Habitat Focus Area with The Nature Conservancy and NOAA Fisheries.

Sea-Run Fishes of Maine Poster

Submitted by Catherine Schmitt on Fri, 04/13/2018 - 11:49

 

After the success of our 2017 calendar featuring Karen Talbot's illustrations of all 12 diadromous fish species native to Maine, we decided to produce a poster featuring the same paintings with updated text. The 24 inch x 30 inch posters are available at no cost. Call our office or stop by an upcoming event to request a copy.

2016-2017 Annual Report

Submitted by Catherine Schmitt on Thu, 08/03/2017 - 09:37

The annual report, featuring impacts, accomplishments, and summary data for the period from 1 February 2016 through January 2017 is now available. Highlights include

More than 60 fishermen from communities across the coast have participated in the Aquaculture in Shared Waters program. To date, 13 have secured leases and a total of 30 are now involved in aquaculture to some degree.

Studying a restored Penobscot River

Submitted by Catherine Schmitt on Wed, 11/09/2016 - 15:18

Between the head of tide above Bangor to where it widens into the bay at Searsport, the Penobscot River shifts from a flowing freshwater waterway banked by cedar and pine to a brackish, wave-lapped marsh with a rocky shoreline. In this estuary, salt concentrations fluctuate as the winds and tides push sea water and sediments back and forth. 

Public Shoreline Access in Maine: A Citizen's Guide to Coastal and Ocean Law, Third Edition

publication coverUnderstanding coastal property law can be daunting for land owners, beach visitors, and municipal officials. Public Shoreline Access in Maine: A Citizen’s Guide to Ocean and Coastal Law describes Maine law and prominent court cases related to public use and access to the coast, from the seventeenth-century Colonial Ordinance that reserved the public’s

Maine's Climate Future: The Animated Edition

Submitted by Catherine Schmitt on Wed, 06/03/2015 - 22:20

We are excited to announce the release of what we hope will be the first in a series of animated videos about climate change in the Gulf of Maine, informed by our work on the Maine's Climate Future project. Produced in partnership with Maine-based O'Chang Studios, "The Lobster Pot Heats Up" illustrates how climate change affects lobster and the lobster industry. 

Maine oysters go wild - and stay wild.

Submitted by Catherine Schmitt on Mon, 03/30/2015 - 09:23

Researchers (including Sea Grant extension associate Dana Morse) are studying isolated oyster grounds in the Sheepscot River that may date back to the last ice age. Meanwhile, as the aquaculture industry has grown and coastal water temperatures have warmed, cultured oysters have begun to multiply on their own elsewhere, particularly in the brackish waters of the Damariscotta River.

Sea Smoke

Submitted by Catherine Schmitt on Tue, 01/06/2015 - 09:42

If the air is still and cold enough, great wisps of sea smoke hover and drift above the water surface. That “smoke” actually is water vapor that forms when really cold air moves over relatively warmer water and the thin boundary layer of warm air just above the surface. When the evaporating water rises, the cold air can only hold so much moisture, forcing the liquid to condense into fog. Clouds rise like smoke from the sea’s surface, dispersing and reforming, turning bays and coves into ephemeral cauldrons of submarine fire.