Natalie Springuel's blog

Radio stories featured in Acadia National Park's 100-year time capsule

Two-thousand sixteen marked the 100th anniversary of Acadia National Park and America’s National Park System.

Young mariners in Maine go to camp, go to college, and go fishing

Have you heard about Maine Sea Grant’s radio show Coastal Conversations? It airs on the fourth Friday of each month at 10 AM on WERU Community Radio 89.9 FM, which broadcasts from roughly mid-coast to nearly the Canadian border. You can also access past shows online anytime here:  http://www.seagrant.umaine.edu/coastalconversations.

Of what value is a gull? by John Anderson

Preface
by Natalie Springuel

Calling all anglers and students! New Study of Freshwater Fish and Angling on Mount Desert Island Needs You!

Freshwater fishing on Mount Desert Island is a tradition that predates the creation of Acadia National Park and continues to this day.

Acadia National Park, Mount Desert Island Historical Society, and Maine Sea Grant are working together to document the history of Mount Desert Island’s freshwater and diadromous fish populations.

On Capturing Remarkable Stories in Downeast Maine

On the surface, there is nothing particularly unique about the interview process. One person asks questions; the other answers. It is an age-old way of collecting stories.

But when you bring a recorder into the process, the dynamic changes. It can be subtle, a shift in emphasis, an awareness of the technology, perhaps even awkward silences. A recorder can trigger self-consciousness because it signals to the interviewee that what they have to say is important.

Maine Sea Grant just launched a new radio program!

Coastal Conversations is a monthly, one-hour public affairs program about coastal issues, on WERU Community Radio 89.9 in Blue Hill and 99.9 In Bangor.

The first show aired on January 23, 2015 and the topic was Ocean Acidification. Listen to the podcast.

Grand Manan, the Dulse Capital of the World

Over the holidays this year, my family and I decided it was time for a trip beyond Downeast Maine. We crossed the border at Calais and drove on to Black’s Harbor, New Brunswick (Canada) to catch the ferry to Grand Manan, an island at the mouth of the Bay of Fundy. I’d been to Grand Manan on a few occasions, once for a wedding ceremony overlooking the sea and its fishing boats. On Grand Manan, life is still timed by the sea.

National Working Waterfront Network Receive Grant to Support Cultural Heritage of Working Waterfront Communities

National Working Waterfront Network steering Committee members Kenneth Walker, Stephanie Otts, Natalie Springuel, and Kristen Grant have received a $9,000 grant from the NOAA Preserve America Initiative. The project, which is intended to build on the Outreach and Education Committee's case study work, will capture both oral historie

How the Two Nation Vacation is All About the Fish

Recently, about 20 tourism industry leaders from Downeast Maine and Southwest New Brunswick piled into a bus and went on a tour of the region.  For nearly four days, we traveled from Saint John New Brunswick to Bucksport Maine, on a world wind tour of the target area of the Two Nation Vacation. 

Catchy moniker, isn’t it? 

The Future of the Salarius Blog

Salarius means "of salt" in Latin. Because salt once constituted a form of currency, Salarius also refers to salt money, an allowance, pay. The ocean pays back, sustains us; it provides food, oxygen, and a livelihood for the people of Maine pas, present, and (hopefully) future. For the authors of this blog, Salarius encompasses all things related to the ocean, the Maine Coast, and the people who live, work, and play here.

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