On Capturing Remarkable Stories in Downeast Maine

Submitted by Natalie Springuel on Thu, 05/21/2015 - 12:37

On the surface, there is nothing particularly unique about the interview process. One person asks questions; the other answers. It is an age-old way of collecting stories.

But when you bring a recorder into the process, the dynamic changes. It can be subtle, a shift in emphasis, an awareness of the technology, perhaps even awkward silences. A recorder can trigger self-consciousness because it signals to the interviewee that what they have to say is important.

Signs of spring in chilly coastal waters

Submitted by Beth Bisson on Wed, 05/06/2015 - 12:53

Wind and a cool drizzle did not deter a group of new volunteers as they ventured down to the end of the Harpswell peninsula near Basin Point last Monday to learn how to spot evidence of spring among the tide pools. The group included Lynn Knight, a trustee for the Harpswell Heritage Land Trust, Sandra Lary, a biologist for the U.S.

Salmon Delivery

Submitted by Catherine Schmitt on Fri, 05/01/2015 - 11:19

April 30, 2015 | Green Lake National Fish Hatchery

After an epic winter, spring has arrived in the Penobscot River Valley. Ice is out on the lower river and most of the tributaries, and the water temperature has reached a still-chilly 5 degrees Celsius. Fred Trasko and the rest of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife crew are preparing to transfer 24,000 smolts to the river for their seaward migration thousands of miles to the sub-Arctic waters around Greenland.

Maine oysters go wild - and stay wild.

Submitted by Catherine Schmitt on Mon, 03/30/2015 - 09:23

Researchers (including Sea Grant extension associate Dana Morse) are studying isolated oyster grounds in the Sheepscot River that may date back to the last ice age. Meanwhile, as the aquaculture industry has grown and coastal water temperatures have warmed, cultured oysters have begun to multiply on their own elsewhere, particularly in the brackish waters of the Damariscotta River.